Mission Behind Bars and Beyond (MB3) reconnects families, provides support and mentoring to returning citizens during their first year of release, and helps reduce isolation by listening and helping to solve problems.  Volunteers serve as positive role models, encouraging and helping restore positive relationships within the community. Here are some of our success stories (the names have been changed to protect the privacy of those whom we serve):

William

When William was released on probation, he immediately found
transitional housing and part-time work.  Things seemed to be going just fine until he began a relationship with a young woman who had issues of her own yet to resolve.  William lost his job and his housing as a result of poor decisions he made with her and soon found himself starting at square one to rebuild what he had accomplished during his first 4-months on release.  He was connected to a trained Nurture, Support and Accountability Group at Jeffersontown Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and with the help of those members, William was able to establish a plan and set goals that would put him back on track.  Today, William has a new job, has purchased a vehicle and has an apartment of his own. 

After working with this NSAG for over a year, William remains in contact with several of its members.

 


Dorothy

Dorothy was 44 when she was released from the Diersen House after completing a substance abuse program as required to be paroled. She had met the members of her Nurture, Support and Accountability Group during Tuesday night worship services at New Life in Christ Christian Church, the congregation affiliated with Mission Behind Bars and Beyond. Prior to her release, Dorothy had met regularly with the congregation's pastor for counseling. Upon her release, her NSAG, affiliated with a Disciples of Christ congregation, began meeting with her and stayed connected with her through daily text messages. Struggling not only with addiction but mental health issues, members of her NSAG were there to provide support during rough patches after her release. Directing her to resources in the community, offering a listening ear and loving her unconditionally, Dorothy's NSAG has provided her with a healthy support she never had before. Employed and receiving mental health treatment, Dorothy has been living in the community for nearly a year as she reconstructs her life.


Bob

Bob has been a life-long criminal.  His criminal history appears to be related to his history of substance abuse.  Bob was a resident from another state. Consequently, he knew no one in Kentucky where he was to be released. Referred to Mission Behind Bars and Beyond by a prison case worker, Bob began meeting with his NSAG, which was comprised of members of several different Disciples of Christ congregations.  In his application to work with a NSAG, Bob wrote, "I am new to Christianity--so I get a little nervous when people are overly nice to me."   After eight months of meeting with his NSAG, he thinks of them as his extended family.  They all celebrated when Bob went to his first college class. The NSAG keeps close tabs on him but after six months have reduced their meetings to once a month because Bob has made such remarkable progress.  He knew no one in Louisville when he was released from prison.